2.03.2017

a new york minute

A teenager rolled onto the train with his bike, a subway accessory that puts most New Yorkers into an immediately irritable state of mind. The doors were closing as a woman pushed through the turnstiles, struggling with several bags. As she gathered herself on the platform, the teenager noticed her, and used his free arm to hold the door open. She casually strolled onto the train without even a glance in his direction. As the doors closed and we pulled away, a fellow rider caught his eye and quietly said: Hey, good job. The teenager sort of shyly shrugged. No really, she didn't say it, so I'm saying it. Good job, he repeated in a warm, but matter of fact manner.

The local train plodded on, and a voice made its way down the car, asking for any little bit of help, I'm down on my luck, please, anything you can spare. Shy Teenager opened up the bag strapped to his bike and pulled out what looked like a completely untouched sack of to-go food. Down On His Luck gratefully accepted the bag. Hey, yeah! My wife will eat this, I'll eat this, what she doesn't eat the cat will eat. 

The doors closed again. You're a good kid, said the Thank You Man. Shy Teenager shrugged again. No. You're a Good. Kid. Thank You Man reaffirmed, and got out at the next stop with one last approving nod.

Shy teenager straddled his bike, put his headphones on, put his head down, and enjoyed the rest of his ride with small smiles aimed at him from every direction.

(Best guesses at races involved this story, simply because, as a mixed chick, it's something I'm always aware of, and heartened by, in instances like this... Shy Teenager: Mixed, maybe Hispanic/Indian. Thank You Man: White, maybe Irish/German. Strolling Woman: Asian, maybe Korean. Down On His Luck Guy: White, maybe Mediterranean. I adore the great big melting pot of the subway.)

Heading into the weekend, I'd like to thank you for your comments on my last post. I started to reply to each and every one, but because the thing I wanted to say most was thank you, for being good people, and being good to one another, I'm going to say it en masse here. Thank you. The sentiment is not specific to my personal situation as much as it is specific to the world's shared situation. Your good words and actions are always appreciated by someone, and I'd like you to always know that.

32 comments:

  1. I really needed a story like this today. Thank you so much for sharing this. There's a whole lot of good in our world and maybe we all need to not only do more for others but also recognize the random acts of kindness we witness.

    ReplyDelete
  2. See... you LOVE THE SUBWAY! <3 xoxo

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love these moments, and it makes me miss taking public transit. I used to teach high school, and it drove me crazy to hear other adults in San Francisco talk about how "disrespectful" the local kids were. I was like, you don't see these kids every day. You don't see the way they help each other and lift each other up. The way they hold doors open for elderly ladies and protect their younger siblings on the train. These are good kids. And we don't tell them that enough.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. that's wonderful to hear-- i know a lot of teachers can get (understandably) burnt out, but those who see the good in kids and lift them up are superheros. thank you for that!

      Delete
  4. Love it!!! Saw many such exchanges during my visit to NY (and the subway) in Sept. Thanks for noticing...and sharing! With a good kid, a thank you man, and a beautiful soul willing to tell the story...there is hope for all of us.

    ReplyDelete
  5. It is a very nice story and a really great kid and good man. There are lots of stories like this but we don't usually hear about them because what hits the news is the sensational stuff. Little moments are important moments.

    ReplyDelete
  6. A great story, reading your story shows me their is good people in the world

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thank you for the very nice story, darling. Your posts always make my day happier.

    ReplyDelete
  8. It's your kindness and joy, as well as your amazing creativity, that keeps me coming back.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thank YOU for sharing things that make my heart happy.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Great story, Marcie! You are a very good writer, you know?

    ReplyDelete
  11. HA! See, what did I say? You DO have a unique and powerful voice. Definitely write a book! (And use the royalties to buy lots and lots of gorgeous fabric.) Cindy (Creative Hormone Rush)

    ReplyDelete
  12. Thanks for that post. It helps. And God Bless America. Look at how great we already are.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Thank you for sharing this story. It was just what I needed to wake up to this morning.

    ReplyDelete
  14. What a great story. I have one for you.

    My blog friend's daughter's friend is from Somalia. He came here with nothing. Now he is a bilingual almost-teacher in our area, with only a bit of student teaching,etc. to do before graduating. Last month, there was a fire in the neighbor's apartment. The Somali friend was able to grab his car keys and his coat and jump out the second floor window and is safe. Everything in his apartment was lost. His books, computer, clothes, furniture, everything. My friend's daughter put up a goFundMe, and the goal was met in just three days. Good people are out there. It's the nasty ones that are loudest. And the good people are fighting, but yeah. Sometimes we need a beauty break.
    Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. that's amazing. it's what this country is supposed to be (and can be, and has been, and IS). thank you for sharing that!

      Delete
  15. What a beautiful story. I enjoyed every word of it! There are kind, respectful, and caring people out there in this chaotic world. With all of the negative things going on right now, this was most certainly a 'breath of fresh air'. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Gosh Marcy you just brought a tear of happiness to my eye on the bus this morning! I'm going to be saving this to read whenever I am feeling disheartened. Thank you, we all need to be sharing more of these kind of stories

    ReplyDelete
  17. Ahh, that brought tears to my eyes right here on the train. Those transcendent moments sure change the tone of your day, don't they?

    ReplyDelete
  18. Thanks for this story. It shines a light of optimism, reminding me of the capacity for good in each of us at a time when fear, anger and selfishness seems to dominate our news. Yet here you show we still have the ability to be kind to each other, and to appreciate kindness freely given, even if not given to us. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Wonderful story. There is still kindness in the world but it gets overshadowed by the other stuff.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hubby is a high school teacher. Teenagers don't get thanked and complimented enough. Too many people are only critical. It tears them down- and we reap what we sow. Thanks for the positive story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And thank you to your hubby! We don't thank teachers enough, either.

      Delete
  21. I can only say I really enjoyed that story. It's one of those that makes me miss NYC!

    ReplyDelete

i thankya truly for taking the time to comment, i love a good conversation-- and hope you know my thanks are always implied, if not always written!