12.02.2017

Vogue 1493 Tips!

oonaballoona | by marcy harriell | Vogue 1493 Tips!

Hello elves. I know you're out there, churning out handmade holiday gifts to beat the band and fight the consumerism power! Might I suggest, if you're in need of a pattern for someone special on your list, something more than an eye pillow, something with a little bit of WOW factor: Vogue 1493 by Koos

I haven't seen very many of these in the wild, and I think it's because it looks super fussy on the envelope. It's complicated, but it doesn't have to be quite so complicated. Allow me to persuade you. 

1. Let's talk bias binding. Oh hohoho! Sewist, skip aaaaaall of that extra bias binding applique! Yes, it's cool, but if you pick a wild pattern or a textured fabric, you're not going to need that all that extra. (And, even if you use a solid, it still looks super cool, especially if your "solid" has texture.)

2. Are there really 13 pattern pieces? Nope, not if you're following my previous sage advice...then you're only using pieces 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 & 12. The other six pieces are bias binding & duplicates with markings on them for all of that extra applique that you're merrily skipping. You're welcome.

3. This is a great pattern to make for others, as it's sized in ranges. Size ranges are great for gifting. Especially when the receivers, you know, don't get that we need to measure them every once in awhile. It does have quite a bit of ease-- the envelope puts me at the larger end of M, but I cut XS. I'd say go down at least one size.

oonaballoona | by marcy harriell | Vogue 1493 Tips!

4. Save some fabric! Hey, who's going to see that inside seam on the sleeve? Thaaaaat's right. Save a little fabric, especially if it's super pretty fabric that you only have so much of. Add seam allowance to the foldline of Lower Sleeve 8, and cut a contrasting bias facing for the sleeve hem. Overlock your inner sleeve seam, and you've saved a seriously good amount of fabric. Really need to scrimp? Leave off the side vents, and sew the side seams up as one long seam. MORE SCRIMPING, SCROOGE? Reduce the width of the front facing, as I did here--it's just one long rectangle of fabric, joined at center back.

5. Mark. All. Your. Notches. And. Dots. This pattern loves a good mark, and rewards you for taking the extra 3 minutes to transfer them to your yardage. Definitely mark your seamline at that triangle point on piece 6. You'll do a little dance of joy when you finish that seam perfectly at first go.

oonaballoona | by marcy harriell | Vogue 1493 Tips!

5. Think about how you want to handle those raw edges in advance! Koos calls for each seam to be bound, which is a beautiful thing, but you can also get away with other treatments. Some of my seams are overlocked, as the fabric is spongy and hides thread, some are turned under & stitched, some are bias bound. The pocket is the only section that'll throw a wrench in your timesaving plans if you're opting out of bias binding (ask me how I know), and in that case, you can always sew up the side front seam and leave the pockets out. 

6. OH STOP YELLING I KNOW YOU LOVE POCKETS. Ok, irritable elf, why don't you sew up that side front seam, and throw some patch pockets on the front? Or, you know, you can stay up till 3am drinking egg nog and muttering about why you always do this to yourself, as you bias bind each and every seam. I won't judge. I especially won't judge if that "someone special" you're sewing for is yourself ;)

(You can see the full frontal of this Koos jacket today, over at the Mood Sewing Network. Now I gotta go sew like 800 things. Probably while drinking egg nog. Happy weekend, y'all! Don't' bias bind anything I wouldn't bias bind!)

41 comments:

  1. Ooh, so fun! I really like how the contrast fabrics on the sleeves turned out. Well done!!!

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    1. thanks Gillian! Save all those ankara scraps... you can use it for eeeeeverthing.

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  2. All thumbs up!

    I've had this pattern forever...it goes to the top of my list...and then I have a lookey at the instructions and set it aside. I love how you've simplified the make but kept the pizzazz of the garment!

    Yep...this will make a wonderful gift....for me, LOL.

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    1. get cracking on that gift! you deserve it ;)

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  3. I like the Pinterest Rendition. Love your K.I.S.S. instructions.

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    1. isn't that beautiful? someday i'll make a chic version like that...maybe...

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  4. Your version is great..... Fantastic fabric choice!

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  5. Hahaha, I totally was up at 3am muttering to myself (with wine, it was May) binding all the seams on this jacket! I used packaged tape, though, at least. I did the bias decoration too, which was almost a disaster, but it was worth it. I made it as a retirement present for a work friend out of a beautiful gold silk twill she had given to me a few years earlier. She bought it for a special garment in the 70s but never made anything. This pattern will always be special to me :) Anyway, yours is so good. I love the contrasting sleeve pattern placement and hint of color on the inside. Beautiful!

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    1. HAHA. I'd love to see yours, sounds like you really went all the way for your friend!

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  6. Gorgeous! And great tips for simplifying the process!

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  7. I really like this on you! And you're right it has made me look at the pattern differently!

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  8. I love your blog, you take patterns that I would never think twice about and make them into something amazing, just like you did with this one. Thank you for the inspiration!!

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    1. thank you so much! I hope I've inspired you to try it :)

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  9. Another stunner! Thank you for weighing in with tips to simplify this project. Like many others, I get out the pattern, have a lovely time dreaming then sigh and put it away. I love your version, especially the sleeves with the two fabrics and that cheeky bit of lining at the cuffs. You're an inspiration and the pattern now gets to live at the top of the pile. I'm gearing up for some sewing pretty darn soon.

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    1. Oooooh I hope you make this. Really, it can be done so simply and still be a special garment.

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  10. I love this. And your earrings! How do they match so perfectly!?!

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    1. RIGHT?! I adore those earrings. Never would I have imagined wearing them with black & white!

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  11. I love this on you and I'd love to see more photos of this jacket, especially interior details. With all the modifications, do you still feel this pattern is a winner, or would it be simpler to pick another jacket pattern that is more simple?

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    1. Thank you, Carmen! I'll try to get some interior details. Then you can see where I realized I needed the bias binding if I was going for pockets ๐Ÿ˜‚ The pattern is absolutely a 100% winner, in fact, it's a very simple pattern if you take away the applique & include all marks & notches. Really no modifications, other than to omit steps!

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    2. (mmm, I thought of a better way to say all that: I basically took the pattern down to it's simple, well drafted, bare bones.)

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  12. This is stunning. Perfect fabric choice. You're inspiring me to make this too but I don't think I could find fabric I like as much as this.

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    1. this fabric, admittedly, did a lot of the work for me!

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  13. I love this! And I'm watching nurse Jackie on Netflix and I'm loving the oona/Marcy sightings. I might have squealed when I saw you :)

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    1. ah, thank you! I've played so many nurses, I must have been one in another life ๐Ÿ˜‚

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  14. I have made this pattern (Sept 2016 on my blog magscreativemeanderings.blogspot.co.uk and I love it, especially the sleeves. Compared to other simple kimono patterns it was fiddly but the challenge is part of the appeal to me, and yes all that bias binding probably too the majority of the time. I love your version.

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    1. How beautiful, your version is sumptuous! And in viscose, one of my favorite fabrics :)

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  15. You had me at the sleeve. I've put my size on back order at my fave pattern supplier. <3 I have some rather scrummy viscoses that would look awesome in this for summer. It's so blinking hot here, and our burn time is very, very short. Thank you for bringing this to our attention xo

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    1. You will LOVE making up these sleeves. Hope it gets to you in time!

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  16. I LOVE that! Also, when my husband and I were binging the first season of Search Party and the scene at Bellows and Hare came up I literally shouted, "I KNOW HER!!!" when you appeared on screen and had to be shushed because our son was sleeping in the other room. :D We are obsessed with that show! Congrats on the part!

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    1. Haha, two sightings in one comments section! I'm surprised my character's cackling didn't wake your kiddo up ๐Ÿ˜‚

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  17. Just found it on Etsy! I'm going to try it. Thank you!

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  18. Oh you are making me feel so guilty for not taking time to sew gifts for Christmas this year but it's December already (What?! Already?! It can't be!) and I know I still have time but if I started now I would be in constant panic mode from now until the big day and that's no way to spend the holidays. Still... this jacket is making me think of one particular sister-in-law.

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    1. ooooh girl take that guilt RIGHT away, and sew one for yourself! If you find you can't take the guilt, you can always box it up at the eleventh hour for sis-in-law :))

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  19. This has to be one of your funniest posts, which is saying alot. =)

    FINE.

    PATCH POCKETS.

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    1. HAHAHA! thank you! I know sewists will go to war over pockets!

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i thankya truly for taking the time to comment, i love a good conversation-- and hope you know my thanks are always implied, if not always written!